Ask me anything

Archaeology student. Bristol.
Essex/East London borderline. Honestly, I have no idea what I'm doing here.
It's comparative anatomy time!

jangojips:

Yey comparative anatomy!
These are both from bobcats. The cranium on the right is pretty normative. The cranium on the left is from the ULTIMATE bobcat. Notice how robust the left cranium is in comparison to the right! Notice the size difference! So cool!

image

Cat (felidae) skulls…

6 months ago
43 notes

spookyphoque:

stop for just one second.

think about all the people you’ve secretly had a crush on. all the people you’ve found attractive, but never said anything to. every stranger you’ve temporarily fallen in love with on public transportation. all the people you’ve dreamt of and thought of in the early mornings.

and now take a moment to realize that you have been this person for so many people… and you have no idea.

Someone stared at me on a train once. It wasn’t until he got off that I realised I had pen on my face.

Prime example of why I don’t believe this.

(Source: clusterphoque, via ink-stained-tardis)

6 months ago
444,654 notes

blurredbynes:

i had self esteem for like 3 minutes once

(Source: jetbag, via britishbullet)

6 months ago
322,578 notes
erikkwakkel:

Devouring a book
As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.
Pic: image taken from this news piece.

erikkwakkel:

Devouring a book

As I have shown in previous posts (like this one), medieval and early-modern books were damaged not just by the hands of their readers, but also by animals. Hungry animals, that is. Mice and beetles in particular loved to dig into the parchment and paper pages, devouring words in an unwanted way. This big hole in a 17th-century Italian manuscript is an extreme example, fortunately, through it is symptomatic for the fact that books are constantly under attack from nibbling creatures - who are as persistent as they are hungry. It is only in the care of a good library that such old books can lean back in peace, knowing they are safe.

Pic: image taken from this news piece.

(via gardant)

6 months ago
751 notes

thechosenjuan:

honestly a good partner isn’t necessarily someone who loves the exact same things you love but rather someone who is willing to listen to you ramble on and on about a particular subject that you’re passionate about even if they have little to no interest in it

(via unspectacular-but-always-human)

6 months ago
176,511 notes
archaeoillustration:

DOC2/121 - The Gosforth Cross by Marten Kuilman 
BLACKER, Carmen & LOEWE, Michael (1975). Ancient Cosmologies. George Allen & Unwin Ltd., London.

archaeoillustration:

DOC2/121 - The Gosforth Cross by Marten Kuilman 

BLACKER, Carmen & LOEWE, Michael (1975). Ancient Cosmologies. George Allen & Unwin Ltd., London.

(via britishbullet)

6 months ago
40 notes